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A partnership between biology and engineering

Nature Biotechnology volume 22, pages 12111214 (2004) | Download Citation

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Acknowledgements

I am grateful to Drew Endy, Tom Knight, Gerald Sussman, Rob Carlson, Larry Lok and Harvey Eisen for useful discussions over many years, and to Paul Rabinow, Orna Resnekov, Myron Williams and the anonymous reviewers for criticisms that greatly improved this manuscript. Work is supported under Alpha Project at the Center for Genomic Experimentation and Computation, an NIH Center of Excellence in Genomic Science, supported by grant P50 HG02370 to R.B. from the National Human Genome Research Institute.

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  1. Roger Brent is at The Molecular Sciences Institute, 2168 Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley, California 94704, USA. brent@molsci.org

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nbt1004-1211

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