Review Article

Lithium battery chemistries enabled by solid-state electrolytes

  • Nature Reviews Materials 2, Article number: 16103 (2017)
  • doi:10.1038/natrevmats.2016.103
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Abstract

Solid-state electrolytes are attracting increasing interest for electrochemical energy storage technologies. In this Review, we provide a background overview and discuss the state of the art, ion-transport mechanisms and fundamental properties of solid-state electrolyte materials of interest for energy storage applications. We focus on recent advances in various classes of battery chemistries and systems that are enabled by solid electrolytes, including all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries and emerging solid-electrolyte lithium batteries that feature cathodes with liquid or gaseous active materials (for example, lithium–air, lithium–sulfur and lithium–bromine systems). A low-cost, safe, aqueous electrochemical energy storage concept with a ‘mediator-ion’ solid electrolyte is also discussed. Advanced battery systems based on solid electrolytes would revitalize the rechargeable battery field because of their safety, excellent stability, long cycle lives and low cost. However, great effort will be needed to implement solid-electrolyte batteries as viable energy storage systems. In this context, we discuss the main issues that must be addressed, such as achieving acceptable ionic conductivity, electrochemical stability and mechanical properties of the solid electrolytes, as well as a compatible electrolyte/electrode interface.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering under award number DE-SC0005397.

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Affiliations

  1. Materials Science and Engineering Program and Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.

    • Arumugam Manthiram
    • , Xingwen Yu
    •  & Shaofei Wang

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The authors declare no competing interests.

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Correspondence to Arumugam Manthiram.