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Metabolism: Tick, tock, a β-cell clock

The daily light–dark cycle affects many aspects of normal physiology through the activity of circadian clocks. It emerges that the pancreas has a clock of its own, which responds to energy fluctuations.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Katja A. Lamia is at the Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.  klamia@scripps.edu

    • Katja A. Lamia
  2. Ronald M. Evans is at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.  evans@salk.edu

    • Ronald M. Evans

Authors

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