Scientific Correspondence | Published:

Rubber hands ‘feel’ touch that eyes see

Nature volume 391, page 756 (19 February 1998) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

Illusions have historically been of great use to psychology for what they can reveal about perceptual processes. We report here an illusion in which tactile sensations are referred to an alien limb. The effect reveals a three-way interaction between vision, touch and proprioception, and may supply evidence concerning the basis of bodily self-identification.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    & & Psychon. Sci. 2, 215–216 (1965).

  2. 2.

    L'Encephale 1, 57–84 (1937).

  3. 3.

    , & Journal of Neurophysiology. 70, 1578–1584 (1993).

  4. 4.

    , & J. Exp. Psychol. 43, 58–67 (1952).

  5. 5.

    , & Nature 377, 489–490 (1995).

  6. 6.

    & Science 266, 1054–1057 (1994).

  7. 7.

    Lewis, M. & Brooks-Gunn, J. Social Cognition and the Acquisition of the Self (Plenum, New York, 1979).

  8. 8.

    & Developmental Psychology 21, 963–973 (1985).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, and Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA  email: mmb@crab.psy.cmu.edu

    • Matthew Botvinick
    •  & Jonathan Cohen

Authors

  1. Search for Matthew Botvinick in:

  2. Search for Jonathan Cohen in:

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/35784

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.